Debatable: The Glass Ceiling

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Debatable: The Glass Ceiling

The Magnet Tribune: Briana Sepulveda

The Magnet Tribune: Briana Sepulveda

The Magnet Tribune: Briana Sepulveda

Vivian Coleman, Staff Writer

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Depicted as a creation carved from man, the Bible conveys that women were grafted solely to provide men companionship. The words submissive and women soon became synonymous as the patriarchy demanded conformity from their lesser halves. Many believed the superiority of males originated from the biblical story conveying that Eve sprouted from Adam’s rib. In economic, social and religious terms, women have always been viewed as the inferior of the two sexes, with expected gender roles and forced aspirations that make up what a woman should be. Historically, women have been labeled as second-class citizens, because women have been burdened with expectations that they are forced to shoulder, they have suffered persecution and discrimination nationally, and they are not given the same opportunities as males. 

The glass ceiling is “an intangible barrier within a hierarchy that prevents women or minorities from obtaining upper-level positions.” This definition conveys that women are not as oblivious as people believe; they are aware of the divide that they face within this nation, yet they are helpless as to how to “shatter” the glass. Women have been labeled as second-class citizens—someone who is not given the same rights as others—within this patriarchal nation, because women have been burdened with expectations that they are forced to shoulder. For instance, there are various individuals in the United States who believe that a woman‘s place is as an obedient and submissive wife placed in her husband’s shadow. For instance, Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh was accused of sexually assaulting five women during his life. Despite these accusations, the republican party earnestly yearned to seat Kavanaugh to avoid giving the bench to the democrats. Senator Jeff Flake was swayed by the victims; however, he voted for Kavanaugh before he was cornered after his vote was cast. One of Kavanaugh’s proclaimed victims stated that, “If you vote for this man than you are saying that my assault didn’t matter, that women do not matter in this nation.” Nevertheless, there are many in this nation that would have preferred that these women remained silent.

Historically, women have been labeled as second-class citizens because women have suffered persecution and discrimination nationally. During the progressive era, Susan B. Anthony was arrested during her attempt to vote in New York City. Through her efforts, along with the help from her companions, women gained their suffrage. However there were many males against the ratification of this amendment such as: Joseph Pulitzer and President Woodrow Wilson. In the early 1900s, Joseph Pulitzer published an article with a drawing from William Randolph Hearst that depicted women blindly voting with children and strollers in arms. Women suffer from persecution and discrimination because there are certain gender roles that they are expected to fulfill. Women are expected to bear children and take care of domestic errands. 

Women are considered a minority in this nation, however with this “gender-equality” awakening, women have started to find voices that many had never known or that had been oppressed. Yet in this modern day and age, women have been labeled as second-class citizens, because they are not given the same opportunities as the opposite gender. For instance, the gender wage gap is instilled within today’s culture, along with numerous patriarchal ideas. On the other hand, women can effect change at both a national and state level by forming organizations and speaking out through civil disobedience. By standing with one another, women can reform this nation where both men and women receive equal opportunities in their endeavors. 

America is a country that was derived from the yearning for basic human rights institutionalized between all people. Denying women these basic rights when many have bloodied themselves for the furthering of this country is not the American way. Historically, women have been labeled as second-class citizens, because women have been burdened with expectations that they are forced to shoulder, they have suffered persecution and discrimination nationally, and they are not given the same opportunities as men. However, these conflicts can be amended, and America can prosper into the country it was cultivated to be.